Phase I - 5 - Communication - Use A Common Language - Use Common Terms

This is a Request For Comments about how to structure doctrine in terms of microdoctrine (a pattern language for implementing and learning doctrine)

Phase: Stop Self Harm
Category: Communication
Principle: Use A Common Language
Practice: Use Common Terms

Motivation:
The governance system must provide a mechanism for coordination and engagement between groups. This requires a mechanism of shared learning. An example of shared learning would be discovery and dissemination of good practice. To achieve this, we must have a common language. Collaboration without a common language is only noise before failure.

Consider these first:
Understand What Is Being Considered

Illustrative description:
There are many terms associated with doctrine. It is helpful to use a common definition of them.

Detailed description:
Use terms in a way that maintains their common definition. Below definitions are common across doctrine and mapping.

Context - Our purpose and the landscape
Environment - The context and how it is changing
Situational Awareness - Our level of understanding of the environment
Actual - The map in use
Domain - Uncharted vs Transitional vs Industrialized
Stage - Of evolution e.g. Genesis, Custom, Product, Commodity
Type - Activity, Practice, Data or Knowledge
Component - A single entity on a map
Anchor - The user need
Position - Position of a component relative to the anchor in a chain of needs
Need - Something a higher level system requires
Capability - High level needs you provided to others
Movement - How evolved a component is
Interface - Connection between components
Flow - Transfer of money, risk, and information between components
Climate - Rules of the game, patters that are applied across contexts
Doctrine - Approaches which can be applied regardless of context
Strategy - A context specific approach

STOP READING, TAKE ACTION

Consider next:
Use Maps or Use Common Symbols

Reproduced and adapted from writings by Simon Wardley under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.